The United States and the Caribbean Area

The United States and the Caribbean Area

The United States and the Caribbean Area

The United States and the Caribbean Area

Excerpt

No other Latin American country has suffered more than the Dominican Republic from internal disorder, financial exploitation and foreign intervention. Santo Domingo City was the first center of European power in the New World, but the colony of which it was the capital was to a great extent abandoned after the discovery of richer territories in Mexico and Peru, and the few Spanish families which remained suffered much during the European wars of the eighteenth century from attacks by the more numerous and wealthier French colonists who had taken possession of the western end of the island. Between 1801 and 1809, the Spanish settlements were successively conquered by Toussaint L'Ouverture, occupied by French troops, and reconquered by Spain. In November 1821 the Dominicans revolted from Spain and hoisted the flag of Colombia, but three months later their territory was overrun by Haitian troops and annexed to the neighboring Republic. A revolt in 1844, at a time when the Haitian Government was occupied by revolutionary disturbances at home, established the independence of the Dominican Republic. Haitian efforts at reconquest were defeated by the tenacious resistance of the Dominicans, and by emphatic diplomatic representations from the United States, France and Great Britain, but it was not until 1855 that the last Haitian invasion was repulsed.

Even during the wars with Haiti, there was almost con-

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