Wau-Bun: The "Early Day" in the North-West

Wau-Bun: The "Early Day" in the North-West

Wau-Bun: The "Early Day" in the North-West

Wau-Bun: The "Early Day" in the North-West

Excerpt

It seems appropriate for the year in which Chicago is to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of its incorporation as a village by "A Century of Progress" that we should choose as the subject of our annual volume Mrs. Kinzie's WAU-BUN.

The Lakeside Press cannot go back to the year 1833, but its beginning dates back to 1864, when Mr. Richard Robert Donnelley with his young wife and three-months-old son came to Chicago from Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, to become a partner in the firm of Church, Goodman & Donnelley.

Chicago at that date still had many of the earmarks of the frontier town, but it already had a population of 170,000 and was growing by leaps and bounds. Its limits were Fullerton Avenue, Western Avenue and Thirty-Ninth Street, but the street cars ran only to North Avenue, Ashland Avenue and Thirty-First Street. South Water Street was alive with shipping, and Lake Street was the principal shopping district. State Street, south of Madison Street, had recently been raised, but part of the residences . . .

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