Security and the Middle East, the Problem and Its Solution: Proposals Submitted to the President of the United States

Security and the Middle East, the Problem and Its Solution: Proposals Submitted to the President of the United States

Security and the Middle East, the Problem and Its Solution: Proposals Submitted to the President of the United States

Security and the Middle East, the Problem and Its Solution: Proposals Submitted to the President of the United States

Excerpt

Peace freedom, and prosperity, dream-and aspiration for the world, are immediate imperatives for the Middle East--for the Arab states and Israel both. Here on a subcontinent of more than two million square miles, forty million persons, straining against feudal bondage, threaten eruption against hunger, disease and poverty. Social, political and economic unrest make this area the world's newest danger spot, especially vulnerable to Communist assault.

In token of its belief in the danger of outside aggression, the United States is now negotiating a series of agreements for the arming of individual Arab states, in the hope of subsequently persuading these states to enter into military alliances uniting them with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. But the resulting improvement in the political relations between the Arab governments and the United States, in the fundamental sense is making for less rather than for more stability in the area. Nor has it increased security in the event of external aggression. For under present conditions no Arab state, no matter how extensively armed by the United States, is able to fight a defensive war against outside aggression, lacking, as they all do, men, training, combat experience, esprit de corps, or any sense of a cause to fight for.

The new arms agreements feed only the amour-propre of the Arab governments. Their immediate effect is to promote an arms rivalry among the states, increase the tensions between these states and Israel; and incite the covetiveness of the Soviet Union. For this subcontinent is the gateway to Europe, Africa and the Far East; the gateway to the military bases of the Western alliances and to the rich oil and other mineral resources of the Middle East and Africa, invaluable in peace and indispensable in war.

But most important of all is the unresolved inner peril. Arms to the Arab states do not supply food for the hungry, freedom for the oppressed, health for the sick, jobs for the unemployed, development for the underdeveloped area, rich in potential. These are the real problems of the Middle East. And because supplying arms does not resolve them, arms agreements unbuttressed by large-scale measures for social and eco-

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