Health Economics: Efficiency, Quality, and Equity

Health Economics: Efficiency, Quality, and Equity

Health Economics: Efficiency, Quality, and Equity

Health Economics: Efficiency, Quality, and Equity

Synopsis

This book is a thorough, balanced, and insightful study of the present status and future direction of health care economics and its far-reaching ramifications. Eastaugh provides exhaustive analyses of such major issues as: cost behavior and cost functions; economic models and physician behavior; cost sharing, managed care, and competition health plans; equity, access and the urban medical center; consumer education, service quality and health manpower; efficiency and cost-benefit; and future policy trends. It is designed to provide the tools necessary to balance issues of efficiency and quality.

Excerpt

In preparing this book I have intentionally cast a wide net to include policy makers, providers, managers, and students. I anticipate that this wide audience is more interested in a synthesis of currently available study results and possible policy implications than in new econometric methods. This book and its antecedent, my text Medical Economics, parallel the development of the field of health economics. Our focus has shifted from medicine to health care, and balancing efficiency and quality are now paramount issues for public policy. Almost 50 percent of this new text centers on the topics of cost-benefit, cost- effectiveness, quality enhancement, and technology assessment. By contrast, most health economics texts spend very little time on these four critical topics. in this text major emphasis is placed on concepts and their applications, as opposed to dry standard presentation of microeconomic theory. Many faculty members in this discipline teach both economics and finance and might utilize the companion volume to this text, Health Care Finance: Economic Incentives and Productivity Enhancement.

Part 1 presents a basic overview of the overtilled and recently developed fields of cost analysis, production functions, and provider cost behavior (chapters 1 and 2). Part 2 considers economic models of physician and hospital behavior and recent changes in methods for paying physicians (chapters 3 and 4). in Part 3 (chapters 5 and 6) the focus shifts to employee cost sharing, health maintenance organizations (HMOs), gatekeepers to contain utilization, and the use of case managers in long-term care.

Part 4 involves a discussion of equity, social welfare, and the unique problems of the urban medical center; chapter 7 considers access and the uninsured population, and chapter 8 presents cost studies for teaching hospitals and outlines a number of patient-severity systems. Part 5 (chapters 9 and 10) focuses on consumer information, quality measurement, and health manpower policies for nonphysician providers. in Part 6 (chapters 11-13) we discuss cost-effectiveness . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.