Occupied Haiti: Being the Report of a Committee of Six Disinterested Americans Representing Organizations Exclusively American, Who, Having Personally Studied Conditions in Haiti in 1926, Favor the Restoration of the Independence of the Negro Republic

Occupied Haiti: Being the Report of a Committee of Six Disinterested Americans Representing Organizations Exclusively American, Who, Having Personally Studied Conditions in Haiti in 1926, Favor the Restoration of the Independence of the Negro Republic

Occupied Haiti: Being the Report of a Committee of Six Disinterested Americans Representing Organizations Exclusively American, Who, Having Personally Studied Conditions in Haiti in 1926, Favor the Restoration of the Independence of the Negro Republic

Occupied Haiti: Being the Report of a Committee of Six Disinterested Americans Representing Organizations Exclusively American, Who, Having Personally Studied Conditions in Haiti in 1926, Favor the Restoration of the Independence of the Negro Republic

Excerpt

In 1925 the international office of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom was asked by certain of its Haitian members to look into conditions in Haiti. The International Executive Committee at its meeting in July of that year then asked its United States section to take the matter up, and as a result a committee of six was organized, which sailed for Haiti on February 19, 1926.

This committee consisted of two representatives of the United States Section of the W. I. L. P. F., two representative colored women, a professor of economics representing the Foreign Service Committee of the Society of Friends, and a representative of the Fellowship of Reconciliation.

They made every effort to meet informants of different shades of opinion. They talked with business men and with chance acquaintances of many types including French priests, Protestant missionaries, technical employees of the Occupation, and Haitian teachers, professors and doctors. They received most valuable information from various American officials, including Dr. Butler and Dr. Schmidt of Port-au- Prince, of the Medical Service; Dr. Freeman, of the Agricultural Service; officers of the Gendarmerie and, above all, General John H. Russell, American High Commissioner, and Dr. W. W. Cumberland, Financial Adviser.

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