The Enneagram Intelligences: Understanding Personality for Effective Teaching and Learning

The Enneagram Intelligences: Understanding Personality for Effective Teaching and Learning

The Enneagram Intelligences: Understanding Personality for Effective Teaching and Learning

The Enneagram Intelligences: Understanding Personality for Effective Teaching and Learning

Synopsis

First taught in the United States in 1971, the Enneagram is now used in counseling settings, corporations, university classrooms (including Stanford Business School) and other educational institutions. The Enneagram system is a model of human development which describes nine patterns of personality. Each type is distinct with its own point of view and focus of attention based on nine psychological strategies. Janet Levine, a long-term educator, and with many years experience using the model, has through research and refinement, pioneered an application for educators and students in their quest to facilitate teaching and learning. This is an in-depth description of the system, and a practical guide.

Excerpt

People often ask me how the Enneagram has influenced me as an educator. This is a provocative question because I did not set out to be an Enneagram educator, or a pioneer. I was not trained to integrate what in essence is a model of personality used for personal awareness and growth into an application to education. Yet when I first came across the Enneagram system I saw that education and the Enneagram belonged together.

Why do I hold so dear this conviction and vision about spreading knowledge of the Enneagram model and the impact of personality in education? In essence, it simply makes unquestionably good sense to me to provide these practical tools for enhancing educational dynamics. In my native South Africa, since adolescence I was an antiapartheid activist. If I distill my motivations for political activism, it is to an idealistic belief in human rights and the notion of equal opportunities for all people. In many ways this belief system spills over to my current embrace and advocacy of the Enneagram model: an idealistic drive to bring the gifts of this knowledge to as many people as possible. I want especially to reach young people through educators (teachers, educational psychologists, parents, caregivers), so they may mature with a positive sense of self, a deeper understanding of why they do what they do, and how to be effective in the world.

Since 1986, I've taught English at Milton Academy in Massachusetts. Some 1,000 students attend Milton Academy, and 160 teachers work there. There are 65 million students enrolled in all educational institutions in the United States and 3.8 million teachers at all levels. Around the world there are billions more students and millions more educators. With all the possible combinations of teaching situations that exist, how can it be acceptable that essentially one way of teaching and one way of learning have become the worldwide standards by which all educational opportunities are measured?

The Enneagram system presents a meaningful shift from the standard hierarchical model in which it is the educator's job to impart content and material in . . .

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