Irritability: A Physiological Analysis of the General Effect of Stimuli in Living Substance

Irritability: A Physiological Analysis of the General Effect of Stimuli in Living Substance

Read FREE!

Irritability: A Physiological Analysis of the General Effect of Stimuli in Living Substance

Irritability: A Physiological Analysis of the General Effect of Stimuli in Living Substance

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The lectures on irritability here published were held at the University of Yale in October, 1911. When the authorities of that University honored me by an invitation to give a course of Silliman memorial lectures, I accepted with the more pleasure as it furnished me with the opportunity of summarizing the results of numerous experimental researches carried out with the assistance of my co-workers during the course of more than two decades in the physiological laboratories of Jena, Göttingen and Bonn, to unite therewith the results obtained by other investigators and thus present a uniform exposition of the general effects and laws of stimulation in the living substance. I have long entertained this plan and this for the following reason:

The physiologist, the zoölogist, the botanist, the psychologist, the pathologist, have to deal, day in, day out, with the effects of stimulation on the living substance. No living substance exists without stimulation. In the vital manifestations of all organisms the interplay of the most varied stimuli produces an enormous and manifold variety of effects. Experimental biological science employs artificial stimulation as the most important aid in the methodic production of certain effects of stimulation. The number of researches in which special effects of stimulation are treated is endless. Nevertheless the systematic investigation of the effects of stimulation have, curiously enough, been strangely neglected. Although countless results of individual effects of stimulation have been studied, the attempt has never been made to establish a general physiology of the laws of stimulation and consider it as an independent problem. This circumstance induced me to systematically investigate the general laws of the effect of stimulation. In the fifth and sixth chapters of my book on general physiology the results of these studies are recorded for the first time. Since then, especially during our own researches on the general physiology of the nervous system, a great number . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.