The Philosophy of Humanism: And of Other Subjects

The Philosophy of Humanism: And of Other Subjects

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The Philosophy of Humanism: And of Other Subjects

The Philosophy of Humanism: And of Other Subjects

Read FREE!

Excerpt

In an early passage in his Metaphysics Aristotle pronounces the views of his predecessors to be tainted with an artificial character. Of this he sets himself to get rid in his own view of the object world. "Surely," he says, "it is not likely either that fire or earth or any such element should be the reason why things manifest goodness and beauty both in their being and their coming to be, or that those thinkers should have supposed it was; nor again could it be right to ascribe so great a matter to spontaneity and luck. When one man declared, then, that reason was present--as in animals so throughout nature-- being the cause of the world and of all its order, he seemed like a sober man in contrast with the random talk of his predecessors. . . . Those who thought thus stated that there is a principle of things which is at the same time the cause of beauty, and that sort of cause from which things acquire movement."

It is more than two thousand years since Aristotle said this. In the interval there has been enormous progress in knowledge of certain orders. Turning to facts and applying methods for exact observation and measurement the science of to-day has grown . . .

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