The Critical Philosophy of Immanuel Kant - Vol. 2

The Critical Philosophy of Immanuel Kant - Vol. 2

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The Critical Philosophy of Immanuel Kant - Vol. 2

The Critical Philosophy of Immanuel Kant - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Kant once said that the advance of time often brings with it an increase of light upon the thoughts of a great writer which enables us to understand him better than he understood himself. The saying ought above all to apply to a writer like Kant himself, whose words have been so fertile of suggestion to other writers, and, indeed, have been the main source of one of the greatest developments of speculations in modern times. For thus we are enabled to see, as in a magnifying glass, the full reach and compass of many of his thoughts, which for himself were very imperfectly evolved and defined. In the foregoing pages, I have tried to criticize Kant mainly by the light which he himself had kindled; or, in other words, to read his meaning, first, in view of his own mental development as shown in his successive works, and, secondly, in view of his influence on the subsequent history of philosophy. In truth, in relation to any fertile thought, as in relation to any germ of life, we may say that its growth is its criticism. The developed organism is the only sufficient demonstration of the content and meaning of the seed.

Kant is best criticized in view of the development of his own . . .

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