Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Philip Sidney

Excerpt

When the news of Sir Philip Sidney's death reached England there was an extraordinary demonstration of grief. He was mourned by ordinary people as a soldier who had died fighting for the Protestant cause. He was mourned by his friends and relations as the 'light of his family', a man who had seemed destined for greatness as a statesman. He was mourned by scholars and writers as a generous patron, and by his fellow-poets as one of the best, and certainly one of the most influential, poets of his time. Oxford and Cambridge published collections of Latin elegies; and Spenser, Greville and others contributed to Astrophel, a volume of English elegies. Years later, Fulke Greville regarded his friendship with Sidney as his chief tide to fame; and when Shelley wrote Adonais he could speak of his great ancestor as one of the 'inheritors of unfulfilled renown':

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