Where Peoples Meet: Racial and Ethnic Frontiers

Where Peoples Meet: Racial and Ethnic Frontiers

Where Peoples Meet: Racial and Ethnic Frontiers

Where Peoples Meet: Racial and Ethnic Frontiers

Excerpt

Many books are written about the Negro problem in the United States; few, if any, about the white problem. In Canada, if one announces that he is about to study ethnic relations in Quebec, people assume that he means to study the French, not the English, Canadians. Likewise, books and articles are written about the Japanese and Chinese in America, the Flemings in France and Belgium, and the Boers in South Africa. In all of these instances, although two or more groups are in contact, one is studied rather than the other, that one which people would ordinarily call, nowadays, the minority--the immigrant, the underdog, the self-conscious group. In current studies of anti-Semitic prejudice, it is not the Jewish minority, but the Goyim, the majority, who are studied. Emphasis is still on one, rather than both, of the groups in contact.

Now there may be a certain practical logic in studying only one rather than both of a pair of peoples who live in contact with each other. The two groups generally do not know one another equally well. One may think that it is misunderstood; that it has grievances which the other group and the world outside should be made to hear. When ethnic . . .

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