The Causes of the English Civil War

The Causes of the English Civil War

The Causes of the English Civil War

The Causes of the English Civil War

Synopsis

Basing his study on extensive new research Professor Russell provides the fullest account yet available of the origins of one of the most significant events in British history.

Excerpt

This work came to exist in its present form because of an invitation to serve as Ford's Lecturer in the University of Oxford for 1987-8. My first thanks are therefore due to the Reverend James Ford, Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford and Vicar of Navestock in Essex, the 'onlie begetter' of these lectures. My thanks are due to the University of Oxford, for inviting me to give the lectures, and for providing a large and thoughtful audience whose comments and suggestions have much enriched the resulting work. I was told by previous Ford's Lecturers that I would find the University's hospitality one of the nicest rewards of giving the lectures, and experience amply confirmed the truth of what they said. For this too, I owe much thanks.

Within the University, my thanks are especially due to the Warden and Fellows of Merton. One of the most pleasant experiences of delivering the lectures was that of having all three of my tutors, Ralph Davis, Roger Highfield, and John Roberts, in the audience, so that the experience was assimilated to the familiar one of reading my weekly essay. They collectively made me a historian, with assistance from my fellow-Mertonians Henry Mayr-Harting, John Fletcher, Michael Clanchy, Bob Moore, and Anthony Fletcher, among others. It is in appreciation that I dedicate this book to the Warden and Fellows of Merton.

All historical research, however much it may be organized on a cottage industry basis, is nevertheless a co-operative enterprise, and in doing the work which has been incorporated in these lectures, I have benefited beyond measure from the community of scholars, national and international, at the Institute of Historical Research. More especially, I owe thanks to the Tudor and Stuart seminar, to which parts of Chapters 3 and 4 were delivered on an experimental basis. The experience, as usual, saved me from errors and gave me fresh insights. The task of acknowledging all my debts to members of that seminar is one for which a preface does not allow space, and in any case, they are probably more numerous and more manifold than even I am aware of. Nevertheless, I would like to acknowledge . . .

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