Moorish Chronicles

Moorish Chronicles

Moorish Chronicles

Moorish Chronicles

Excerpt

The power of these counts increased to such a degree that four of them formed a league to declare themselves independent of the crown of Leon. OrdoDŽo II., who was then king, received notice of it, and got them into his power by force, as some assert, but as others maintain, by perfidious artifice. At any rate, they were brought to court, convicted of treason, and publicly beheaded. The Castilians flew to arms to revenge their deaths. OrdoDŽo took the field with a powerful army, but his own death defeated all his plans.

The Castilians now threw off allegiance to the kingdom of Leon, and elected two judges to rule over them -- one in a civil, the other in a military capacity. The first who filled those stations were NuDŽo Rasura and Lain Calvo, two powerful nobles, the former descended from Diego Porcello, a count of Lara; the latter, ancestor of the renowned Cid Campeador.

NuDŽo Rasura, the civil and political judge, was succeeded by his son Gonzalez NuDŽo, who married Dofia Ximena, a daughter of one of the counts of Castile put to death by OrdoDŽo II. From this marriage came Fernan Gonzalez, the subject of the following chronicle.

CHAPTER I.

INSTALLATION OF FERNAN GONZALEZ AS COUNT OF CASTILE. -- HIS FIRST CAMPAIGN AGAINST THE MOORS. -- VICTORY OF SAN QUIRCE. -- HOW THE COUNT DISPOSED OF THE SPOILS.

THE renowned Fernan Gonzalez, the most complete hero of his time, was born about the year 887. Historians trace his descent to Nuῄo Belchidez, nephew of the Emperor Charlemagne, and Doῄa Sula Bella, granddaughter to the Prince Don Sancho, rightful sovereign of Spain, but superseded by Roderick, the last of the Gothic kings.

Fernan Gonzalez was hardily educated among the mountains in a strong place called Maron, in the house of Martin Gonzalez, a gallant and veteran cavalier. From his earliest years he was inured to all kinds of toils and perils, taught to hunt, to hawk, to ride the great horse, to manage sword, lance, and buckler; in a word, he was accomplished in all the noble exercises befitting a cavalier.

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