The World of Ice

The World of Ice

The World of Ice

The World of Ice

Excerpt

Somewhere on the west coast of Greenland in the spring of 1910--or it might have been 1909--a large iceberg broke off the end of a great glacier and slowly floated out to sea. It is probable, even likely, that the event was witnessed by no one. We neither know precisely where nor when it took place but it did occur; of that there can be no doubt. Where the berg went after that we cannot be certain, but for many months it drifted across northern seas--probably into Baffin Bay and over the Labrador Sea, then out into the North Atlantic. Just before midnight on April 14, 1912, on the edge of the Gulf Stream 400 miles south of Cape Race, Newfoundland, this berg, smaller than when it floated from its parent glacier but still of gigantic size, tore a 300-foot gash along the starboard bow of the "unsinkable" Titanic, the largest ship afloat. Within four hours this magnificent ship foundered, carrying 1,500 persons to their deaths in the worst peacetime sea disaster in history. The World of Ice had made itself felt--this time unfortunately in tragedy-- and had demonstrated that it was a real force to be reckoned with.

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