The United States and the African Slave Trade, 1619-1862

The United States and the African Slave Trade, 1619-1862

The United States and the African Slave Trade, 1619-1862

The United States and the African Slave Trade, 1619-1862

Excerpt

This monograph is not intended to be a history of the slave trade, but rather to show that the slave trade was an important economic and cultural factor in the formative days of the United States, and that the slave trade profoundly affected the relations of the United States with the powers of Europe, particularly Great Britain.

The study is based largely upon secondary sources and upon published primary material. We have sought to synthesize scholarship rather than add to the facts already known. Still, we interpret the men and events of the slave trade somewhat differently from most authors, especially as regards the question of American efforts to put an end to the trade.

We gladly admit our indebtedness to Mr. Warren S. Howard, whose recently published American Slavers and the Federal Law, 1837- 1862 (Berkeley, University of California Press, 1962) and his previous doctoral dissertation, upon which we have drawn, are veritable gold mines of facts which we would otherwise have had great difficulty in locating. We are indebted, too, to Professors David M. Potter and Don E. Fehrenbacher, of the Department of History of Stanford University, for critically reading the manuscript. For the various tasks of checking footnotes, typing, and editing, we should like to thank Dr. Kenneth Glazier, Mrs. Irma Goldner, Mrs. Madère Olivar, Mrs. Evelyn Wentworth, Mrs. Helen Kmetovic, and Mr. Jesse Phillips.

The opinions and judgments expressed here are those of the authors only.

Peter Duignan

Clarence C. Clendenen . . .

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