Manpower Strategy for the Metropolis

Manpower Strategy for the Metropolis

Manpower Strategy for the Metropolis

Manpower Strategy for the Metropolis

Excerpt

This introductory chapter has three objectives. It will present certain basic facts about the important changes that have been affecting the people who live within the New York metropolitan area. It will highlight some of the major changes in the structure of business, particularly with regard to the jobs that are available within the region. And it will furnish an overview of the chapters which comprise this book so that the reader can see at the outset the dynamic changes in the economic life of the metropolis that, in our opinion, have such momentous consequences for the development and utilization of the city's manpower resources.

In the decade of the 1950s the population of New York City ceased to grow. The Census of 1960 showed a total of 7.782 million people in New York City, or roughly 110,000 less than the 7.892 million counted in 1950. Although estimates for the mid-1960s indicate a modest increase, it appears that the city proper is not likely to expand in the near future much beyond the 8 million mark.

Within this relatively stable total, marked changes have occurred in the groups which comprise it. The most striking changes during the 1950s were the exodus of the white population to the suburbs and the less but still substantial in-migration of Negroes and Puerto Ricans. When . . .

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