American Opinion of German Unification, 1848-1871

American Opinion of German Unification, 1848-1871

American Opinion of German Unification, 1848-1871

American Opinion of German Unification, 1848-1871

Excerpt

The present study is an outgrowth of an interest in German history quickened by Professor Carlton J. H. Hayes and of a seminar paper suggested by Professor Charles Dowher Hazen on the American attitude toward the Franco-German War. Undertaken shortly after the dose of the World War, it was particularly interesting to the author because it lent color to his belief that national loves and hatreds are not permanent and ineradicable but on the contrary are inclined to vary with the ever-changing course of events. The United States had at that time just passed through a period when it was popularly believed that every Frenchman was naturally and inherently a hero and every German instinctively and unalterably a baby-killer. A study of the Franco-German War revealed an American sentiment very different from that of 1918. The author being much interested in German history thought it natural and advantageous to enlarge the scope of the investigation to include a study of American opinion toward and during the whole period of German unification. Inasmuch as the process of German unification involved relations with Hungary and even more with France and inasmuch as it would be quite impossible to present adequately American opinion of Germany without a consideration of American opinion of Hungary and of France, it has been deemed advisable to introduce a section on the American opinion of Hungary and a chapter on the American opinion of France.

Since so large a portion of the material has been taken . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.