Thirteen by Corwin: Radio Dramas

Thirteen by Corwin: Radio Dramas

Thirteen by Corwin: Radio Dramas

Thirteen by Corwin: Radio Dramas

Excerpt

This book is, I think, the richest contribution yet made to the newest form of literature. Though other writers besides Norman Corwin have written plays to be broadcast on the air, and good ones, he stands out as an accomplished, acknowledged master. He is to American radio what Marlowe was to the Elizabethan stage. To Corwin belongs the credit for not only seeing what might be done with the radio script as an art form but also for doing it in a whole series of plays, poetic or humorous, which exhibit the full range of the art at present. And since the earliest of his original plays dates back no further than to Christmas 1938, he has, as time goes, only begun the career in which, as achievement counts, he is already a veteran.

Like pantomime, one of the oldest literary forms, the radio play reaches us through the channel of a single sense. As in pantomime we see without hearing, so on the radio we hear without seeing. Most persons, asked for their first opinion, will say they would rather see what actors do than hear what they say. The actual experience of the deaf and the blind does not confirm this choice. The blind who can hear are more often happy than the deaf who can see. Let persons who have both senses try an easy experiment. They will find, at a play or a motion picture, that if they close their eyes and listen they do not miss as much as they think they are missing when they stop their ears and look. And in real life, no matter how clearly we see what is happening out of earshot, we can seldom help wishing we could hear what is being said; whereas when we are eavesdropping we can be in-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.