Modernizing Foreign Assistance: Resource Management as an Instrument of Foreign Policy

Modernizing Foreign Assistance: Resource Management as an Instrument of Foreign Policy

Modernizing Foreign Assistance: Resource Management as an Instrument of Foreign Policy

Modernizing Foreign Assistance: Resource Management as an Instrument of Foreign Policy

Synopsis

The United States' foreign assistance program has become an instrument of declining efficacy in foreign policy. The ebbing of Soviet-American competition offers an occasion to restructure U.S. foreign policy objectives and modernize those instruments most likely to support the execution of new foreign policy objectives. This book sets out to identify new approaches to the management of resources in the foreign assistance program that would permit the flexible manipulation of these resources to cope with the fast-breaking pace of international affairs.

Excerpt

The world is changing at a rapid pace. So, too, is America's role in the world community. This book is an attempt to deal with the resource implications of these rapid changes for U.S. foreign assistance policy and to chart a course that will permit resources to be available on terms sufficiently flexible to be responsive to the needs of American foreign policy into the second millennium.

The fall of the Berlin wall, the liberation of Eastern Europe, the reunification of Germany, the dissolution of the Warsaw Pact, the collapse of communist regimes and their political legitimacy, the spread of democracy and free markets throughout the world are all a profound affirmation of the goals of the United States and the Western Alliance. The progress made to date is still fragile, and a great deal must be done to consolidate and sustain these gains and to allow democracy and free markets time to flourish. Yet, the opportunities for freedom and growing prosperity worldwide are now enormous.

The end of the Cold War brings other challenges as well as regional tensions: the reopening of long-suppressed conflicts, unpredictable Third World leaders with agendas of their own, and the uncontrollable diffusion of potentially dangerous technologies with military applications.

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