The Golden Greek

The Golden Greek

The Golden Greek

The Golden Greek

Excerpt

IT ALL began in Cairo and Beirut. I happened to be passing through Cairo in August or September of 1943. The invasion of Sicily had just been completed, and the Naval Staff, to which I was then attached, considered that as a reward for its efforts it would be sent back to England and at once put to work planning the cross-channel invasion of France. The Sicilian operation had been thorny to plan and difficult to mount. But it had been a success. We felt, a little cockily perhaps, that we knew our jobs. The lunge into the Pas de Calais or the heart of Normandy was obviously our next logical assignment. Thus, almost inevitably, the Admiralty ordered us forthwith to India.

I had a friend in Cairo at that time, with the somewhat unlikely name of Saxon de Koek. He was an R.N.V.R. lieutenant holding a liaison appointment, the exact nature of which I never discovered, at the General Headquarters of the Middle East Command. I suppose he was in a sense the naval equivalent of a "Groppi Grenadier." Groppi's, at that time, was the Rumplemeyer's and Ritz Bar of Cairo rolled into one. In its cool marble halls leathery, sun-baked officers could be seen on most days, shaking the sand of the Western Desert off their worn suède boots. Battle-scarred and exhausted . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.