Education of the Gifted

Education of the Gifted

Education of the Gifted

Education of the Gifted

Excerpt

The Educational Policies Commission published Education for All American Youth in 1944 and Education for All American Children in 1948. In these volumes it was shown that all children and youth have many educational needs in common and that they also differ from one another in significant respects. Accordingly, it was recommended that a common core of experiences should be shared by all students in elementary and secondary schools and that these students should also have differentiated opportunities to meet their varied needs.

The educational needs of individuals who have superior intellectual capacity and of those who possess special talents in high degree differ in some important respects from the needs of other individuals. To capitalize the rich resources of human talent which gifted children and youth possess, the schools and colleges must give special attention to the education of their gifted students. This policy, clearly stated in Education for All American Youth and Education for All American Children, needs further emphasis and elaboration.

Acquaintance with present educational practices has convinced the Commission that the gifted members of the total school population constitute a minority which is too largely neglected. Part of the neglect stems from attitudes widely held among the American people, attitudes which tend to obscure the great social need for able and educated leaders and to withhold needed funds for making adequate educational opportunities available to all gifted youth. Part of the neglect results from the circumstance that inadequate buildings and equipment and an insufficient supply of teachers prevent schools and col-

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