Black Americans and the White Man's Burden, 1898-1903

Black Americans and the White Man's Burden, 1898-1903

Black Americans and the White Man's Burden, 1898-1903

Black Americans and the White Man's Burden, 1898-1903

Excerpt

America,'s overseas expansion at the close of the nineteenth century has been the subject of a voluminous and varied historical literature. In addition to broad interpretative works concerned with the origins, nature, and implications of the new imperialism, numerous monographs and essays have concentrated on more specific aspects of the topic. Despite wide differences in approach and emphasis, most of these studies at least touch upon the relationship between imperialism and racism. For some scholars, in fact, the nation's embrace of an imperialistic policy played an important role in transforming the "Mississippi plan" of race relations into the American Way. Perhaps more acutely than other Americans, Negro citizens at the time were conscious of the domestic ramifications of overseas expansion. This study attempts to chart their responses to and their role in the quest for empire between 1898 and 1903. I hope it contributes another dimension to the existing literature on America's imperialistic endeavors and provides some insight into what Negroes themselves perceived as the impact of such enterprises upon their place in American society.

Confronted by a rising tide of prejudice and discrimination in the 1890's, Negro Americans increasingly emphasized self-help, group loyalty, and racial solidarity. Their heightened race consciousness was nowhere more evident than in their responses to the imperialistic activities of Western nations, especially the United States, among darker races at the turn of the century. No less than whites, blacks voiced a variety of opinions regarding the nation's involvement in Hawaii, Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines. Some opposed it as an expression of Anglo-Saxon supremacy and as a perverted ordering of national priorities which would further undermine the already precarious condition of black citizens; others enthusiastically embraced the New Manifest Destiny in the . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.