Ten Days That Shook the World

Ten Days That Shook the World

Ten Days That Shook the World

Ten Days That Shook the World

Excerpt

Ten Days That Shook the World is the title that John Reed gave to his remarkable work, which describes with extraordinary drama and power the first days of the October Revolution. The book is far from a simple enumeration of facts or a collection of documents; it is a series of living scenes so genuine that they cannot fail to evoke in the mind of every witness analogous scenes which he himself has observed. Reed's depictions, so true to life, vividly convey the feelings of the masses -- thus enabling us to grasp the true meaning of the events of the great revolution.

At first glance, it may seem strange that such a book was written by a foreigner, by an American unfamiliar with the language and the customs of the country. It would be natural for him to fall into absurd error, to omit some essential factor. Too often when foreigners write about Soviet Russia, either they understand very little about the events, or else they generalize from isolated facts that are not at all typical. To be sure, there were very few foreigners who witnessed the revolution.

John Reed, of course, was not an indifferent observer. Revolutionary in spirit, a Communist, he understood the meaning of the event, the meaning of the great struggle. Out of this consciousness came his acuity of vision, without which it would have been impossible to write such a book.

Even the Russians no longer write like this about the October Revolution. Either they evaluate it, or they limit themselves to describing episodes that they have witnessed.

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