Emotion in Man and Animal: Its Nature and Relation to Attitude and Motive

Emotion in Man and Animal: Its Nature and Relation to Attitude and Motive

Emotion in Man and Animal: Its Nature and Relation to Attitude and Motive

Emotion in Man and Animal: Its Nature and Relation to Attitude and Motive

Excerpt

Although this volume has been arranged in a form convenient for classroom use, I have aimed to make it more than a textbook. I have attempted to bring a degree of order into the abundant but highly disorganized assortment of facts relating to feeling, emotion, and attitude. To tie together these diversified facts in an orderly way, the assumption has been made that they are multiple aspects of a single psychological event. Since each aspect is based upon a particular point of view or attitude, this method of analysis is called the attitudinal approach.

In the present study the central point of reference is the individual who experiences an emotion and reveals it in behavior. It must not be assumed that body anti mind are two separate entities, but rather that the individual is one integrated psychobiological whole. This assumption of biological monism underlies every part of the present work, making it possible to harmonize what would otherwise appear to be unrelated or conflicting observations upon emotional processes. This conception puts the wealth of physiological material and the subjective descriptions of emotion in proper perspective, and it relates them to observed emotional behavior.

Second in importance only to the assumption of biological monism is the basic postulate, adhered to consistently throughout this study, that an emotion is a disruption or disorganization of the total individual, and not an integrated process.

The aim of this study is far from a purely theoretical one. The facts and principles here presented have practical bearings upon child development, education, social psychology, anthropology, and related fields, as well as upon the conflicts and adjustments of everyday living. This book is intended for students who have had an introductory course in psychology. It has been used at the University of Illinois as a textbook for a course upon feeling and emotion. It may be employed as a second book in courses dealing with special topics -- motivation, adjustment, personality, learning.

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