A Legend of Montrose

A Legend of Montrose

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A Legend of Montrose

A Legend of Montrose

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Excerpt

"A Legend of Montrose" appeared in company with "The Bride of Lammermoor," and was written under the same influences of severe illness and acute bodily pain. It is needless to anticipate what will be said on this topic, in the Introduction to the longer novel. A patient who could find escape for his soul into the free air of the northern hills, was able, despite sufferings which would have quelled any other spirit, to create Scott's most humorous character, Dugald Dalgetty. Never was a more signal triumph of mind over body: never a more convincing disproof of the strange theory that Scott's genius was subdued by the tribulations of the flesh. Montrose was a character necessarily attractive to Scott. His greatness may not be so conspicuous to us now as it was to his contemporaries on the Continent, who recognised in him a parallel to Plutarch's men. But the romance of his character and genius was always evident, and to Scott especially delightful. Among the spoils of Montrose, after the fatal day of Philiphaugh, were found three small silver lockets. "They are heart-shaped. On one side is carved a long straight sword, and below it a winged heart, and on the other a heart pierced through with darts, and the motto: 'I live and die for loyaltye.' The inside of the lid bears the words: 'I mourn for Monarchie.' The portrait on the outside . . .

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