Problems of the Baltic

Problems of the Baltic

Problems of the Baltic

Problems of the Baltic

Excerpt

For sheer speed, nothing in previous history had approached the Baltic vicissitudes of 1939. Without firing a shot, Lithuania found herself first dismembered by Germany and then subjugated by Russia. The one by depriving her of Memel reduced her territory by 5 per cent., her population by 6 per cent., and her nascent industry by a far higher figure. The other, while depriving her of real independence, increased her territory by 13 per cent. and her population by almost one in five. Poland suffered in a month a bloody dismemberment such as in the eighteenth century needed more than twenty years. The way was thus prepared for the conquest of Denmark within a night.

Thus in the autumn of 1939 German aggression made the quiet Baltic, a region not far distant from Britain, but little known to her people, the theatre of a desperate battle for civilisation. Might is . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.