The Lambeth Conferences: The Solution for Pan-Anglican Organization

The Lambeth Conferences: The Solution for Pan-Anglican Organization

The Lambeth Conferences: The Solution for Pan-Anglican Organization

The Lambeth Conferences: The Solution for Pan-Anglican Organization

Excerpt

The author's approach to the history of the Lambeth Conferences was that of a student of British constitutional and imperial history. He was led to a study of the Anglican Communion by his preceding interest in the secular development of the British Commonwealth of Nations.

As originally planned it was proposed to deal with all the conferences that have been held to date. Upon investigation, however, it became apparent that an adequate treatment of the subject as a whole, involving as it would a comprehensive history of the Anglican Communion since 1850, must await the future. Therefore, it was decided to confine this monograph to the antecedents of Pan-Anglican organization and the work of the first two conferences, which set and established the precedent for the future meetings of a like nature.

One difficulty, and a most serious one, which faced the author was the impossibility of obtaining access to the debates of any of the conferences after the first. There has never been any official publication of the debates of the conferences. From the outset it was decided that such publication would be inexpedient. An account of the debates of the first conference was, however, published unofficially in the Guardian under unusual and unexplainable circumstances, as described in Chapter IV below.

Throughout the preparation of this study the author received helpful advice from R. L. Schuyler, Professor of British History at Columbia University. He wishes also to express his gratitude to Carlton J. H. Hayes, Seth Low Professor of History at Columbia University, and to William Walker Rockwell, Librarian at the Union Theological Seminary, who read the manuscript and made several invaluable suggestions. He takes the opportunity of recording his indebtedness to the Rev. William W. Manross, who, thanks to his knowledge of Anglican ecclesiastical history, made valuable suggestions which have improved the study at many points. W. R. C.

NEW YORK CITY, 1941 . . .

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