Recreating the Past: A Guide to American and World Historical Fiction for Children and Young Adults

Recreating the Past: A Guide to American and World Historical Fiction for Children and Young Adults

Recreating the Past: A Guide to American and World Historical Fiction for Children and Young Adults

Recreating the Past: A Guide to American and World Historical Fiction for Children and Young Adults

Synopsis

Helping young people select appropriate historical fiction is easy with this annotated bibliography of 970 recommended American and world titles published to early 1994. Spanning grades 1-10+ it includes adult titles suitable for young adult readers. At least 200 of the titles are award winners. Each entry contains both reading and interest grade levels, a short incisive annotation about the historical event, setting, plot, protagonist and theme, current publication availability, and awards won. Seven reference appendices allow the user to search by country of setting, reading and interest grade level, protagonists from minority groups, sequels or the same characters in a series, important historical dates, and a glossary of historical and famous people or groups appearing in the works.

Excerpt

The historical novel, as a literary genre, evolved and rose to heights of popularity in the early nineteenth century with the novels of Sir Walter Scott in England. Some critics assert that Scott's novels are no more than "costume" novels, set in a different time period but With characters acting like they would at the time when the novel was written. Regardless of the assessment, the genre did not gain momentum in the world of Children's and Young Adult literature until the 1950s. Isolated novels, such as Eric Kelly The Trumpeter of Krakow, Carol Ryrie Brink Caddie Woodlawn, and Rachel Field Calico Bush, written before World War II, still deserve recognition, but the work of novelists like Great Britain's Cynthia Harnett, Rosemary Sutcliff, and Henry Treece, or William O. Steele in the United States occurred after the war. Many of the best books were produced during the 1960s and 1970s by many writers included in this annotated bibliography.

In his nineteenth century commentary, On the Historical Novel (Rpt. Univ. of Nebraska Press, 1983), the Italian writer Alessandro Manzoni discussed the difficulties of creating a work of art that incorporates both fact and fiction. To him, the form of historical fiction uses dialogue in a concrete narrative with precise dates, places, and events. the content includes customs and art of the time period as well as social and economic class distinctions. Manzoni traces the development of the historical novel from the time of the classical epics circa 800 bc, The Iliad and the Odyssey.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.