New Religious Movements in Western Europe: An Annotated Bibliography

New Religious Movements in Western Europe: An Annotated Bibliography

New Religious Movements in Western Europe: An Annotated Bibliography

New Religious Movements in Western Europe: An Annotated Bibliography

Synopsis

The first compilation that brings together publications on New Religious Movements (NRMs) from across Western Europe, this useful work includes titles written in most European languages. The Introduction provides an overview of NRMs since 1960 and places them in a global perspective. The literature, from the late 1970s to the present, covers areas of study such as sociology, psychology, history, theology, and more, and will be of interest to scholars and students in many disciplines. The work is a companion piece to Diane Choquette's New Religious Movements in the United States and Canada: A Critical Assessment (Greenwood, 1985).

Excerpt

The first impulse has been to focus on the newness of the phenomenon of religious movements in the late twentieth century. It seems to be an unprecedented event. Furthermore, the new religious movements seem a suspicious development, promoting social and cultural dislocation. It has been asked, are these groups not a further erosion of the traditional religions that have promoted civilization? Are they not themselves creating conditions in which "things fall apart"? Are they not an escape from rationality?

Hurst &Murphy, New and Transplanted Religions in Movements and Issues in World Religions

New religious movements do not and cannot set up "altar against altar" in every town and neighborhood and are not at their best advantage in competition with the Sunday morning service. Rather, they are likely, on the one hand, to have a center or centers (a school, community, retreat or meditation hall) which are even more intense than what the average parish church offers and, on the other hand, to exercise a diffuse influence, largely among nonmembers, through lectures, books, periodicals, correspondence courses, and even radio and television.

Ellwood, Introduction in New Religious Movements in the United States and Canada

New Religious Movements (NRMs) have been with us for thirty years or more in their modern guise, emerging in what Ellwood terms the "yeasty spiritual ferment" of the 1960s, especially in the United States (Ellwood, 1985: 3). There and in Western Europe, society and social values have become increasingly pluralistic, reflecting in part the significant migrations of peoples and ideas from Africa, Asia and Latin America into cultures previously classified as "Western Christian". With these migrations have come new cultural values and different forms of religious life, which themselves spread more rapidly than in previous decades, due in part to mass communication . . .

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