From McKinley to Harding: Personal Recollections of Our Presidents

From McKinley to Harding: Personal Recollections of Our Presidents

From McKinley to Harding: Personal Recollections of Our Presidents

From McKinley to Harding: Personal Recollections of Our Presidents

Excerpt

The first time I met Major William McKinley was in Canton the day after the Presidential election of 1876. Gus Dannemiller introduced me to him with the remark: "Let me introduce you to our next congressman. This is Major Mckinley's first term; he will be heard from."

Mckinley was an extremely handsome young fellow of thirty-three, with an air of distinction that drew me to him at once. I was ten years his junior and believed Mr. Dannemiller was right when he said: "He will be heard from."

We seldom met until I was an alternate in the Republican national convention of 1888 in Chicago.

Mckinley was chairman of the Ohio delegation. When the nominations for President were made, Mckinley in an eloquent speech nominated John Sherman, of Ohio. During the balloting some one cast a vote for Mckinley. It received great applause from the convention. When the cheering subsided, Mckinley mounted a chair. His face was white and tense. In a voice full of emotion he said:

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Convention:

I am here as one of the chosen representatives of my State. I am here by resolution of the Republican State . . .

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