The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography (Supplement, Series 2) - Vol. 6

The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography (Supplement, Series 2) - Vol. 6

The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography (Supplement, Series 2) - Vol. 6

The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography (Supplement, Series 2) - Vol. 6

Excerpt

Hannah Jameson, an aged Negress of Marshall, was born in Bright Star, Arkansas, about 1850, as a slave of Henry Larry. During her childhood Hannah's father was sold off the place and her mother was given another husband, Cole Copeland. During the war, 1863, Hannah's Master brought his family and a large number of slaves to Texas and settled a plantation near Hughes Springs. Hannah's mother and step-father and family remained on their owner's place for about five years. Hannah married John Jameson, moving to Jefferson and later to Marshall. She has been married twice and raised four step- children. Since her separation from her second 'husband, five years ago, she has been supported by her step-children and Government relief. She now lives with a widowed sister on the Carters Ferry Road, in southwest suburbs of Marshall and receives a $12.00 per month old age pension.

My name is Hannah Jameson. I 'members coming to Texas in 1863, when I was 'bout thirteen years old. I can read and write and tell you lots 'bout slavery times.

I 'members where I was bo'n back in Arkansas, close to Bright Star. There was no towns much dem days. Bright Star was jest a village. There was a store and postoffice and a man rid (rode) a mule and carried mail on a ten mile route.

My father come from North Carolina with Henry Larry and my mother come from Mississippi with John Paterson. The Patersons and Larrys settled on ajinning places there in Arkansas. John Paterson sold my father to Henry Larry and Larry give him to my mother for her man. There warn't no wedding by law and preachers dem days. My mother was named Fannie. She raised three slavery children, me and my brothers, Nelson and Solomon. Den Larry sold my father and my mother took Cole Copeland for her man. She had of the free-bo'n children, William, Jim, Cole, Susie and Mariah. I never seed my father no mo' after he was sold off the place.

I 'members coming to Texas. My mother say it was in 163. When we left Arkansas, I was big enuff to milk and churn and tote wood. I 'members dat like it was yesterday ca'se when we got to Texas they put us out in the woods in a pen to protect us from the wolves and varmits till them could fix us a place to live in. Varmits was as thick as they could be and they darsn't let us out after sundown. Henry Larry built his place right there at Hughes Spring on the big road to Linden. He fixed a regular place for the Niggers. You never seed beds like we had them days. They had jest one leg, you couldn't put them no where but in the corner. They had pole rails and board slats, and dere warn't no a-falling down to 'em. Den we pulled grass and fix the mattress.

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