Art and Artifice in Shakespeare: A Study in Dramatic Contrast and Illusion

Art and Artifice in Shakespeare: A Study in Dramatic Contrast and Illusion

Art and Artifice in Shakespeare: A Study in Dramatic Contrast and Illusion

Art and Artifice in Shakespeare: A Study in Dramatic Contrast and Illusion

Excerpt

This book is not a reprint, with revision. But since it is, at many points, a development and organization of thoughts expressed before, I have had, as a matter of necessity, to recur to these. Of the relation of the present undertaking to the previous ones, I speak more definitely in Chapter I, p. 4; here I wish only to express my gratitude to the University of Minnesota Press for permission to make use of some material in my Othello (1915), Hamlet (1919), and Poets and Playwrights (1930); and the Macmillan Company, of New York, for similar permission with regard to my Shakespeare Studies (1927).

A still greater debt is, manifestly, owing to the publisher of the present volume, penned, on such a subject, by a foreigner. The University of Cambridge, happily, recognizes in the domain of scholarship no walls or frontiers; her Press is not reserved for her faculty or the nation; and it is a particular satisfaction to appear, under such auspices, on Shakespeare's own soil, where the dramatist has, despite my strictures, been more finely and sympathetically interpreted than anywhere else. It is there that men best speak his tongue, best hear his voice.

As an approach or introduction to the text stands an array of principles, or dogmas as I call them, from the . . .

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