Last Letters to a Friend, 1952-1958

Last Letters to a Friend, 1952-1958

Last Letters to a Friend, 1952-1958

Last Letters to a Friend, 1952-1958

Excerpt

The last years of Rose Macaulay's life were extremely active. In March 1955, when she was nearly seventy-four, she wrote to her sister Jean, "I have an intuition that I shall die in three years, i.e. in 1958, so I must bustle about and do a lot of things in the time." A month later she was immersed in The Towers of Trebizond. Her last novel, with its light-hearted blend of satire and fantasy, was entirely characteristic of Rose, as she was then and as she had always been. Its serious theme-- the conflict between the torments and the joys of a guilty love --reflected the tragic secret in her own past (many guessed this when they read the book). But its underlying message--the living hell of not really wanting to journey towards the City of God, in spite of an unforgettable longing for it--was not (as some believed it to be) a representation of her own state of mind at the time she wrote it. For by then, thanks in the first place to her correspondence with Father Johnson, she had already found the way out of her "wilderness" and had attained to serenity of heart and spirit.

In those last six years before her death in 1958 Rose was at her gayest. But it was a new kind of gaiety, with roots in renewed Christian faith: spiritually she had come home. Home to the grace of Divine forgiveness within the Anglican Church she had always loved, to a closer intimacy than ever before within her own family, to the revivified enjoyment of her friendships, her writing, her travels, her reading, her multitudinous doings and interests.

In her earlier letters to Father Johnson--those in Letters to a Friend . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.