Legacies of the American Revolution

Legacies of the American Revolution

Legacies of the American Revolution

Legacies of the American Revolution

Excerpt

Because the discovery and dissemination of knowledge remain the primary functions of the academy, a series of scholarly lectures devoted to an assessment of America's Revolutionary heritage seemed an appropriate way for the largest public institutions of higher education in the state of Utah to observe the nation's 200th anniversary. This volume is the outgrowth of such a series held during the academic year 1975-1976 at the University of Utah, Utah State University, and Weber State College. Ten prominent historians were asked to prepare a public lecture on selected topics relating to the theme, "Legacies of the American Revolution." Michael Kammen inaugurated the lecture series with addresses at each of the sponsoring institutions. Richard D. Brown, Joseph A. Ernst, Sung Bok Kim, and Bernard W. Sheehan visited the University of Utah and Utah State University in Logan. Richard L. Bushman, Jerald A. Combs, Willie Lee Rose, and John W. Shy appeared at the University of Utah and Weber State College in Ogden. Linda Grant De Pauw, Distinguished Bicentennial Professor at the University of Utah, spoke only in Salt Lake City.

In these Bicentennial Times "a decent respect to the opinion of mankind," as Thomas Jefferson would have it, necessitates. an explanation as to the reason for yet another commemorative book about the American Revolution. The intrinsic value of the volume lies, of course, in presenting the views of ten historians concerning the significance of the Revolution. In addition, this collection differs in one or more important respects from other compilations of conference papers, public lectures, or commissioned essays. In contrast to similar anthologies, the volume is comprised of essays linked by a central theme rather than being a melange of eclectic offerings, directed to a general audience instead of a professional readership, concerned more with tracing legacies of the Revolution than with examining the event itself, and written (with one exception) by Revolutionary specialists charged with projecting from 1776 instead of by non-specialists reflecting . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.