P'Yongyang between Peking and Moscow: North Korea's Involvement in the Sino-Soviet Dispute, 1958-1975

P'Yongyang between Peking and Moscow: North Korea's Involvement in the Sino-Soviet Dispute, 1958-1975

P'Yongyang between Peking and Moscow: North Korea's Involvement in the Sino-Soviet Dispute, 1958-1975

P'Yongyang between Peking and Moscow: North Korea's Involvement in the Sino-Soviet Dispute, 1958-1975

Excerpt

At first, the Sino-Soviet dispute posed a serious dilemma for Communist regimes and parties in Asia. On the one hand, they were confronted with the need to "choose" between the People's Republic of China (PRC) and the Soviet Union; on the other, they could not afford, for political and other reasons, to alienate either of the two powers. It can be seen, however, that in the course of time the dispute afforded Communist regimes and parties in Asia an opportunity to enhance their independence by means of adroit maneuvering between Moscow and Peking, each of which had to court them in competition for their support.

The purpose of this book is to analyze how one such Communist regime, that of North Korea, dealt with the situation. This work is not intended, however, to be an exhaustive study of North Korea's relationship with Peking and Moscow. Nor does it include detailed discussion of the Sino-Soviet conflict as such, though some aspects of the dispute are summarized when they are necessary for an understanding of the content of this study. Primarily, this book is concerned with the examination of North Korea's attitude in the dispute and of why and how the North Korean regime has reacted to the specific issues and events in Sino-Soviet relations from 1958 through 1975.

The eight major divisions of this study are arranged chronologically, corresponding to changes in P'yŏngyang's attitudes toward Moscow and Peking, respectively. The first chapter sketches a brief' historical background covering the period from the end of World War II to 1957. Here the chapter examines how the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) and the Korean Workers' Party (KWP) were established, to what extent they were controlled by the Soviet Union, and how much the PRC increased its influence over North Korea during and after the Korean Conflict.

Chapter two is devoted to North Korea's relations with the Soviet Union and the PRC from 1958 through 1959, the period just prior to the outbreak of open controversy between Moscow . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.