Sybil: Or; the Two Nations

Sybil: Or; the Two Nations

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Sybil: Or; the Two Nations

Sybil: Or; the Two Nations

Read FREE!

Excerpt

It is not improbable that, if the modern method of ascertaining the measure of a book's or an author's popularity by newspaper plébiscite were applied toDisraeli novels, Sybil would come in a winner. Others among them may be higher favourites among particular classes of admirers; but none, I think, would collect suffrages from so many different quarters. To those readers whose chief relish is for social and political satire, it can be little less satisfying than its predecessor, Coningsby, and far more so than that brilliant but flimsy extravaganza, Vivian Grey. Those who read a novel frankly "for the story," and want to be interested in plot and action rather than dazzled by dialogue, will certainly find in it more of what they seek than they will in any other of the Disraelian series. And, finally, with two, and those the two most serious of its readers--with the student of English social history, and with the critic of English literature--it has always held and will always hold the foremost place among the works of its author.

To appreciate its merits in either of these two latter respects, it ought to be read after Coningsby for its theories, and after no matter what predecessor for its style. Speculatively speaking it is far the sincerest thing that Disraeli ever wrote. It is almost wholly critical of the . . .

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