Russian Folk Belief

Russian Folk Belief

Russian Folk Belief

Russian Folk Belief

Excerpt

This project began as a study of folklore in the writings of Dostoevsky. While gathering materials on folk belief, I was struck by the absence of information in English, and it occurred to me that a general survey of this subject for those who cannot read Russian might be a good idea. Accordingly, this is not a highly specialized study. Nor is it a study of folk belief and literature, much as this subject coincides with my own interests and training. It does provide a background for such a study and may therefore be of interest to students of Russian literature who, like me, see folk beliefs and superstitions peeking from every page of Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, and other great Russian classics.

Russian Folk Belief is a basic survey of Great Russian (not Ukrainian or Belorussian) folk superstition, intended for a broad audience. For its material it draws heavily on ethnographic data collected in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and on a number of excellent Soviet studies of this data. The book is divided into two parts: a general survey of folk beliefs about spirits and persons suspected of having dealings with the supernatural (Part 1) and a body of translated folk narratives (Part 2). I have not attempted to force any single interpretation of this material or to solve any of the individual controversies about particular mythological figures, though I have attempted to indicate where controversy exists and to provide enough bibliographical information for the interested reader to pursue the topic further. Nor have I considered the particular body of beliefs nourished by religious subgroups, such as the Old Believers.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.