International Education: A Documentary History

International Education: A Documentary History

International Education: A Documentary History

International Education: A Documentary History

Excerpt

"Is it possible for an educational system to be conducted by a national state and yet the full social ends of the educative process not be restricted, constrained, and corrupted?" Thus did John Dewey in 1916 raise the problem of reconciling national loyalty with "superior devotion to the things which unite men in common ends, irrespective of national political boundaries." The problem itself is age-old--the ancients wrestled with it long before the emergence of the nation-state--but it has become ever more insistent with the development of modern national school systems on the one hand, and modern forms of warfare on the other.

Professor Scanlon's collection of hitherto inaccessible documents is designed to lend historical perspective to the continuing discussion of this problem. He views the educative process broadly, including mass communication and sustained cultural contact along with formal schooling. And he views it realistically, recognizing full well that political considerations are often dominant in the determination of school policy. His book ought to go far in advancing the cause of international education as an area for serious and systematic study in universities and teacher training institutions throughout the world.

LAWRENCE A. CREMIN

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