The Industrial Revolution in the Eighteenth Century: An Outline of the Beginnings of the Modern Factory System in England

The Industrial Revolution in the Eighteenth Century: An Outline of the Beginnings of the Modern Factory System in England

The Industrial Revolution in the Eighteenth Century: An Outline of the Beginnings of the Modern Factory System in England

The Industrial Revolution in the Eighteenth Century: An Outline of the Beginnings of the Modern Factory System in England

Excerpt

When this book was first published, more than twenty years ago, its intended object was a double one. It was an attempt to lay before the public a comprehensive survey of one of the most important movements in modern history -- the consequences of which have affected the whole civilized world, and are still transforming and shaping it under our own eyes. It was also meant to call the attention of students, especially in my own country, to a field in which research had hardly begun. How far the first of these aims has been attained, it is for readers to decide. As for the second, the realities as well as the spirit of our times have done more than any individual effort to give its proper value to the economic side of history, and to encourage investigation into the origins and development of that tremendous event, the industrial revolution.

On the various aspects of the facts described in this book, much excellent work has now been done. Special subjects have been studied with much application and success. Original sources have been sought for and scientifically explored. It was not my purpose, had even the time and means at my disposal made it possible, to write another book on the basis of such new information, but only to improve the old one, by giving full consideration to any criticism it may have deserved, as well as to all the valuable results of research in the last twenty years. I have tried to correct and complete a picture, the main lines of which, I believe, should remain unaltered. It would be very gratifying to me if this book in its present form could still serve as an introduction to studies of a more limited scope and a more thorough character. As it was when first written, so it has to remain at present -- a provisional synthesis, open to further improvements. Whoever wishes to retain the confidence of students must regard himself as a student all his life.

PAUL MANTOUX.

January 7, 1927.

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