The Farm Bloc

The Farm Bloc

The Farm Bloc

The Farm Bloc

Excerpt

Bloc, like "spit," has come to be a horrid word, but no accepted substitutes have evolved. Farmers and others who do not like the term probably should blame newspapers for its promiscuous use, as the two short words, "farm bloc," are an editor's dream for fitting many connotations into a punchy headline.

The way was paved for a farm bloc when, in 1789, it was decided at the Constitutional Convention to have a House of Representatives based on population and a Senate of two members from each state. By banding together it technically became possible for senators from rural states to control the fate of legislation against the desire of a numerical majority of the people as a whole.

From that mathematical root grew a plant which may not be indigenous to the United States but has often become a unique centerpiece in the American political panorama. As such, the farm bloc has been hit by more than a usual number of brickbats. If I throw any of them it is not because I want to kick farmers around. No one wants to do that; nor does anyone want to buy food at prices unfair to the farmers who work long hours to grow it.

Neither am I worried about the existence of a farm bloc.

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