Brighton

Brighton

Brighton

Brighton

Excerpt

The authors of any book concerned with so large and deep-rooted a subject as Brighton, must inevitably in the course of its composition have incurred debts of gratitude too numerous and widespread to be acknowledged in detail, and must, therefore, content themselves with proclaiming the most important.

In the first place, together with all lovers of Brighton, they must offer their humble thanks to Their Majesties, The King and Queen, for their kindness in returning to the Royal Pavilion, now that it is a museum, so many pieces of its original furniture; moved therefrom by Queen Victoria at the time of its sale. The interest which Queen Mary takes in the fabric itself is, of course, well known; her influence, moreover, has always been exerted to preserve it and to help restore it to its original condition.

Mr. Henry D. Roberts, the Art Director of Brighton, has been in charge of the restoration of the Pavilion since the War: and it is due to him that the thick layers of Victorian varnish have been carefully removed, so that the wall decorations and ceilings now once more show in their proper glory. To a surprising extent, moreover, the building can be seen, with furniture returned and decorations freshly revealed, in its original condition. But the authors lie, further, under a more private and particular debt to Mr. Henry D. Roberts and wish to thank him for all the help he has so willingly given them, and for his numerous suggestions and emendations.

The pleasant labours of the authors in writing the history of . . .

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