Memoirs of a Revolutionist

Memoirs of a Revolutionist

Memoirs of a Revolutionist

Memoirs of a Revolutionist

Excerpt

The autobiographies we owe to great minds have generally been of one of the three following types: "So far I went astray; thus I found the true path" (St. Augustine); or, "So bad was I, but who dare consider himself better?" (Rousseau); or, "This is the way a genius has slowly been evolved from within and by favorable surroundings" (Goethe). In all these forms of self-representation the author is mainly occupied with himself.

In the nineteenth century the autobiographies of men of mark are very often shaped on these lines: "So talented and attractive was I; such appreciation and admiration I won!" (Johanne Louise Heiberg, "A Life lived over in Recollection"). Or, "So talented was I and so worthy of being loved, but yet so unappreciated; and these were the hard struggles I went through before I won the crown of fame" (Hans Christian Andersen, "The Story of my Life"). In these two classes of life-records, the author is occupied only with what his fellow men have thought of him and said about him.

The author of the autobiography before us is not intent upon his own capabilities, and consequently describes no struggle to gain recognition. Still less does he care for the opinions of his fellow men about himself; what others have thought of him he mentions only once, with a single word.

There is in this work no gazing upon one's image. The author is not one of those who willingly speak of themselves; he does so reluctantly and with a certain shyness. There is here no confession that reveals the inner self, no . . .

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