Cincinnati: A Guide to the Queen City and Its Neighbors

Cincinnati: A Guide to the Queen City and Its Neighbors

Cincinnati: A Guide to the Queen City and Its Neighbors

Cincinnati: A Guide to the Queen City and Its Neighbors

Excerpt

This book has historic importance. It is the last big volume of the American Guide Series, and this preface is being written as the State Writers' Projects all over the country are folding up under the command of war and a shortage of manpower in essential industries.

They have served their country well, these Writers' Projects. They cave it the great story of America, condensed from untold numbers of manuscript pages into hundreds of volumes and several thousand other pieces of literature. During the depression years, their many writers, research workers, clerks, and typists unearthed the past of every American community and wrote it into books that helped give our people spiritual strength when they needed it most. It was partly as a result of this grand literary adventure of government that the Nation held together in those grim days of unemployment and kept itself strong for a major role in a world shaken by war and revolution.

This book on Cincinnati might have been the first instead of the last of the series. The idea for such a volume was born back in 1935 when the Federal Writers' Project was started. Several drafts of the manuscript were completed at various times, but they dissolved as parts of them were published separately in the form of pamphlets and a book on Cincinnati industry. When this final manuscript was begun, all Europe was at war and the United States was being drawn onto world battle fronts.

Many readers are by now familiar with the pattern of the American Guide Series. Each volume-contains a series of essays giving background material, followed by a tour section that describes, point by point, the things worth seeing in the community.

The exigencies of war have caused the writers of this volume to make a few changes in the structure and content of the tours. Because of the rubber shortage, and consequent decrease in auto . . .

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