A Reading of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit

A Reading of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit

A Reading of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit

A Reading of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit

Synopsis

The first edition of this title was much acclaimed as the leading interpretation and exposition of Hegel's "Phenomenology of Spirit." This revision, based on continuing research, keeps this book in the forefront of Hegelian scholarship. The author has made additions and corrections to his reading of this, Hegel's most important work, and he provides an excellent interpretation of Hegel's language, in all of its complexity. To scholars it will remain an indispensable study and students new to Hegelian philosophy will find it approachable and clear.

Excerpt

The question could be asked--and has been by some of my colleagues-- why the author of A Reading of Hegel's phenomenology of spirit has, after seventeen years, engaged in an endeavor to provide a rather copiously revised edition of that volume. Perhaps I should begin trying to answer that question by saying what the work of revision is not trying to do. It is, first of all, not an attempt to update the external scholarship relating to this outstanding work of Hegel's. I have read what has been published on the Phenomenology since 1976, and to some extent I have been influenced by it in my reflections. It is also true that I have been influenced to some extent in revising my views on this or that instance of interpretation. My purpose, however, is to present to the readers the results of seventeen years of reflection on and teaching of Hegel's text--and of my own interpretation of that text.

The result here presented, then, apart from "cleaning up" to some extent the original "Reading," is to add clarifications, some very short and some quite long, some minor and some major, of my original text. It is my hope that this will lead to increased reflection among readers and, perhaps, bring about confrontation with readers who may find reason to disagree with what I am saying. This sort of confrontation might well contribute to a more refined interpretation on the part of the philosophical community of this unquestionably most difficult and, at the same time, most fruitful product of Hegel's genius. I can but trust that the increased length of this study will not make it unacceptable to those who look to Hegel for enlightenment.

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