The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams: Being a Narrative of His Acts and Opinions, and of His Agency in Producing and Forwarding the American Revolution, with Extracts from His Correspondence, State Papers, and Political Essays - Vol. 3

The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams: Being a Narrative of His Acts and Opinions, and of His Agency in Producing and Forwarding the American Revolution, with Extracts from His Correspondence, State Papers, and Political Essays - Vol. 3

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The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams: Being a Narrative of His Acts and Opinions, and of His Agency in Producing and Forwarding the American Revolution, with Extracts from His Correspondence, State Papers, and Political Essays - Vol. 3

The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams: Being a Narrative of His Acts and Opinions, and of His Agency in Producing and Forwarding the American Revolution, with Extracts from His Correspondence, State Papers, and Political Essays - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Adams remains Six Months in Massachusetts. -- His Illness. -- Baron Steuben arrives at Boston. -- Letter of Introduction to Adams from Franklin. -- Adams promotes his Interest in Congress. -- Steuben's Gratitude and Esteem. -- The captured British Army at Cambridge. -- Adams declines an Interview with Burgoyne. -- Silas Deane recalled, and John Adams appointed on the Embassy to France. -- Samuel Adams, Secretary of State of Massachusetts. -- Correspondence with Governor Trumbull. -- Arrival of the French Treaties. -- Franklin writes to Adams concerning them. -- Arthur Lee congratulates Adams on their Arrival.

AT the election in December, 1777, Samuel and John Adams, Hancock, Paine, Gerry, Dana, and Lovell were chosen Congressional delegates. Hancock went to Yorktown in June, where he remained but three weeks, when he returned to Massachusetts.

During the previous summer a constitution of government had been contemplated in Massachusetts, and, in the winter before, the General Court had recommended the people to choose their representatives with that view. A committee of the Legislature, appointed during the present session, reported in January, 1778, a constitution, which was submitted to the people, and rejected by a great majority on the ground that it should have emanated from delegates elected for that specific purpose rather than from the Legislature. It was also preceded by no bill of rights, and the executive power was not satisfactorily adjusted. Although the two Adamses were in Massachusetts when this instru-

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