Video Classics: A Guide to Video Art and Documentary Tapes

Video Classics: A Guide to Video Art and Documentary Tapes

Video Classics: A Guide to Video Art and Documentary Tapes

Video Classics: A Guide to Video Art and Documentary Tapes

Excerpt

Video Classics consists of 80 reviews arranged alphabetically by title. It opens with a title index to the 101 works included in this book. This disparity in numbers reflects the fact that several titles are actually collections of shorter works by a video artist. These 80 tapes were chosen from a much larger universe of original video productions; many works are not included here, not because they are inferior but because this book is designed as a manageable, beginning acquisitions tool for media librarians, archivists, and programmers. A number of tapes which I would have liked to include are no longer in distribution; perhaps increased interest in early video production will render such tapes available again. Subsequent editions of Video Classics can update this list and expand it to reflect not only other artists' work but additional titles by producers already in this edition. After the reviews, readers will find an Artists/Producers Index, a Subject Index, and a Distributors List.

Every review includes basic mediagraphic data: the title of each tape, the principal creative person(s) responsible for it, copyright date, length, whether in color or black-and-white, the distribution source(s), and the video formats in which it is available. All tapes are available for sale, most are available for rental, but prices have not been listed because they vary from distributor to distributor and are subject to change. Although the institutional prices for most original videotapes remain considerably higher than for consumer-oriented, feature films on tape, most distributors are willing to bargain on the prices for half-inch formats, so collectors should make a point of inquiring about lower rates. Not included here is information about availability of tapes for cable, public, or network television; many tapes exist on one-inch masters -- some have also been transferred to the European standards, PAL and SECAM -- but negotiation for the broadcast or cable rights for each tape should be discussed directly with the distributor.

Many reviews also include detailed credit data, listing the names of creative staff involved in the production and post-production of the tape as well as information about funding. Since there is no standardization of terminology employed in writing video credits . . .

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