Campus Planning

Campus Planning

Campus Planning

Campus Planning

Excerpt

The physical forms which house (and will house) the process of education are selfevidently important. The size of the problem we face in designing these facilities is not common knowledge. Between now and 1975 we will have to duplicate (quantitatively) all the campuses which have been constructed from 1636 to 1963. This analogy is perhaps the quickest way of grasping the dimension of a professional challenge which imposes the highest of responsibilities on this generation. We know that institutions are long-lived. How well we meet the task will be the measure by which posterity will judge us.

My objective in this book is to suggest ways and means by which the development of campuses can be controlled, so that functional goals can be aesthetically expressed with least compromise to the past, the present and the future. In suggesting ways and means by which the expected growth can be constructively accomplished I write as a general practitioner of the art of planning. I am not an historian, an educator nor a scholar. These liabilities are also my assets. My viewing point is that of a participant-observer. I aim at giving a broad view of how campuses are being developed, and how present techniques might be sharpened for better results. Having served as a planner for a university community and having been a consultant to a number of institutions in all sections of the country, I also believe that the crisis of expanding higher education will eventually yield good clues as to how to control the urban environment outside the campus. Where possible I have tried to indicate this connection.

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