Ideas of Revelation: An Historical Study, A. D. 1700 to A. D. 1860

Ideas of Revelation: An Historical Study, A. D. 1700 to A. D. 1860

Ideas of Revelation: An Historical Study, A. D. 1700 to A. D. 1860

Ideas of Revelation: An Historical Study, A. D. 1700 to A. D. 1860

Excerpt

The subject of Revelation is of special interest to-clay. Recent writers have been concerned with such subjects as the fact and focus of the divine self-disclosure. This pre-occupation with the problems of revelation is, however, no new thing, for it is the purpose of the following pages to show that the ideas which in recent years have come to prominence are the very ideas which were forced into the foreground in a past period. It will be necessary to mark out this era and to show how these several different views of revelation came about.

Much which has of late appeared on the subject is, we believe, not as original as it is stated. Claims and charges are made which we think would never have been made if writers had come to their subject aware of the historical background of their own particular view. The fact is, of course, that there is no helpful volume to supply this information. There are Histories of specific Christian Doctrines, as, for example, the Atonement and the Person of Christ, but there is little on the subject of Revelation as such. This is an omission which it is the purpose of the present volume to remedy. Apart from the last two or three pages, the remainder constitutes a thesis approved for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the University of London.

The work should have a special interest for serious students of theology. But it should appeal also to the informed general reader who is concerned to know how Christian men have regarded Divine Revelation.

A work of this nature has demanded a good deal of withdrawal to the seclusion of the study and for this reason the author would like to acknowledge the co-operation of his wife and family who did not lay claim to his presence and help when they were rightly demanded.

A special word of thanks must be recorded to the Rev. Professor D. E. Nineham, Professor of Biblical and Historical Theology, King's College, University of London, who read through each section as it was completed. His criticisms and suggestions were of . . .

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