Love, Anarchy, and Emma Goldman

Love, Anarchy, and Emma Goldman

Love, Anarchy, and Emma Goldman

Love, Anarchy, and Emma Goldman

Synopsis

Fifty years after Emma Goldman's death, Candace Falk's newly revised biography captures Goldman's colorful life as a social and labor reformer, revolutionary, anarchist, feminist, agitator for free love and free speech, and advocate for birth control.

Excerpt

It all began with my dog, Emma, a beautiful combination Irish setter and golden retriever, with an alternately wild and loving disposition. In 1971, when I rescued Emma from a dog pound on the East Side of Manhattan, almost everyone in the new women's movement was naming things after Emma Goldman--health collectives, dogs, even babies. T-shirts bore her name and face, and paraphrased her: "If I can't dance, it's not my revolution." The resurgent feminist movement was beginning to assert women's right to untraditional career and family choices, and we looked for models of women who dared to defy convention. Emma Goldman's autobiography became required reading. In this moving account we discovered a woman whose concerns seemed remarkably contemporary. At a time when women were just beginning to claim a voice in the public sphere and break out of more traditional domestic roles, Emma articulated a new vision of the organization of personal life. Living My Life countered the stereotypes of political activists as drab automatons, for in the book Emma told how the joys of intimacy in her private life were heightened by the excitement of her public . . .

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