Defeated Leaders: The Political Fate of Caillaux, Jouvenel, and Tardieu

Defeated Leaders: The Political Fate of Caillaux, Jouvenel, and Tardieu

Defeated Leaders: The Political Fate of Caillaux, Jouvenel, and Tardieu

Defeated Leaders: The Political Fate of Caillaux, Jouvenel, and Tardieu

Excerpt

In this book I have attempted to write political history in the form of comparative biography and to write biography of the "life-thought- and-times" variety in the form of continuous narrative. Whether men make history or vice versa, history is not comprehensible unless men are: hence the advantage of approaching the two simultaneously. Likewise, men's thoughts and actions are always bound up with each other as well as with their historical context; to view them under separate heads, though a convenience in the short run, is ultimately a source of confusion. I have chosen the three men Joseph Caillaux, Henry de Jouvenel, and André Tardieu as means to a study of the Third French Republic -- three men because, while two would have been less instructive, four would have been a crowd, and these three because they were republicans in conflict with the political regime of the Third Republic, and so their lives are a most revealing commentary on it. I have tried to make each life story, each episode even, intelligible and interesting in itself even if significant only in sequence. Finally, I have written for any reader, not just for specialists: the text tells what I think is a self-explanatory tale, and the notes and other addenda are supplementary, not essential, to it.

For whatever merit my book may have I am much in the debt of Jacques Barzun of Columbia University, who saw it through all the formative stages from conception to completion, and of Françis Goguel of the University of Paris, who submitted the whole huge first draft of it to his critical scrutiny. Professors Shepard B. Clough, Walter J. Dorn, and John H. Wuorinen of Columbia University graciously pointed out errors and defects in the penultimate version of it, which I defended before them as a doctoral dissertation in November, 1957. My friends Richard Webster, John Michael Montias, and especially Ralph Gladstone also read parts of early drafts of it for me. Finally my wife, Alice, did all in her power to facilitate its composition, which except for her might not have been possible.

Quotations from André TardieuNotes sur les Etats-Unis (Paris, Calmann-Léevy,1908), Le Mystére d'Agadir (Paris, Calmann-Lévy, 1912) and . . .

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